JOSHUA HASHEMZADEH
 

32 SHADES OF PLASTIC

Opening Reception: Saturday, September 19, 7-11pm

Los Angeles | MRG Fine Art

Joshua Hashemzadeh, born in Los Angeles in 1993, is currently working in San Francisco, CA where he received his BFA in 2015 from the San Francisco Art Institute. His work, often varying in medium, is built around an investigation of postmodern conditions referring in detail to: contemporary identity, social structures, and commerce. Trained as a painter and inspired by Fluxes and California Conceptualist, Joshua looks to infuse traditional discourses around art with larger conversations and alternative forms of art making and viewership. He looks to his practice as a continuum of research and adopts the most fitting of mediums to best portray a particular realm of inquiry. Recent works have been featured in several exhibitions in the San Francisco and Los Angeles areas with recent highlights being: Our Little Angle, Diego Rivera Gallery, San Francisco; Tethered, Like Minded Salon, San Francisco; and Bubbles and Glass, MRG Fine Art, Los Angeles.

32 Shades of Plastic is a collaboration between Joshua Hashemzadeh and his seven year old sister Lauren Gallace. Appropriating images from young girls coloring books Joshua creates subtle breaks in their continuity through the digital alteration of text and line work. The process is then completed with the work being redistributed to and colored by Lauren. The pieces in this exhibition build on the controversies surrounding the portrayal of gender, race, socioeconomic class, and heteronormativity that exists in popular culture. These images, although seemingly innocent, utilize subtle changes that warrant an intimate investigation which challenges the modern immediacy of visual content and pushes the viewer to re-examine how and when these popular tropes enter one's consciousness.  

A portion of the exhibits proceeds will be donated to the GLAAD organization, which aims to rectify common acceptance of stereotypes and the perpetuation of unfair practices and discrimination. 

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